The Joy of Spam Folder Cooking

Category: Breakfast

Boudin Sausage from Emeril Lagasse

I think i may have mentioned in the past that Fred doesn’t like spicy foods.  I actually think is mother convinced him he doesn’t like them, but that’s neither here nor there.  This week, the recipe was Boudin Sausage form Emeril Lagesse.  Now, I don’t watch cooking shows often, but I do know that he’s famous for Louisiana cooking, which is spicy.  I knew there was no way Fred would go for this.

The recipe!

Boudin Sausage

  • 2 1/2 pounds pork butt, cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 1 pound pork liver, rinsed in cool water
  • 2 quarts water
  • 1 cup chopped onions
  • 1/2 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 1/2 cup chopped green bell peppers
  • 1/2 cup chopped celery
  • 4 1/4 teaspoons salt
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons cayenne
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground black pepper
  • 1 cup finely chopped parsley
  • 1 cup chopped green onions tops, (green part only)
  • 6 cups cooked medium-grain rice
  • 1 1/2-inch diameter, casings, about 4 feet in length

In a large sauce pan, combine the pork butt, pork liver, water, onions, garlic, bell peppers, celery, 1 teaspoon salt, 1/4 teaspoon cayenne, and 1/4 teaspoon black pepper.

Bring the liquid up to a boil and reduce to a simmer.

Simmer for 1 1/12 hours, or until the pork and liver are tender. Remove from the heat and drain, reserving 1 1/2 cups of the broth.

Using a meat grinder with a 1/4-inch die, grind the pork mixture. 1/2 cup of the parsley, and 1/2 cup of the green onions, together.

Turn the mixture into a mixing bowl. Stir in the rice, remaining salt, cayenne, black pepper, parsley, and green onions.

Add the broth, 1/2 cup at a time, and mix thoroughly.

Either using a feeding tube or a funnel, stuff the sausage into the casings and make 3-inch links.

Bring 1 gallon of salted water up to a boil.

Poach the sausage for about 5 minutes, or until the sausage is firm to the touch and plump.

Remove from the water and allow to cool

It’s a good thing I didn’t plan on making it, I refuse to use liver of any kind in my cooking.  And Pork butt?  Seriously?

There’s an old quote that I remembered Laws, like sausages, cease to inspire respect in proportion as we know how they are made that’s misattributed (according to Mr Google) to Otto von Bismarck.  After reading this recipe, I think they’re right.

Until next time, toodles!

Molasses Cakes

My spam folder brought me a new recipe, Molasses Cakes.  I’d never heard of these before, but I decided to give them a shot.  They didn’t look that hard, so I went for it.

Molasses Cakes

  • Place in a mixing bowl
  • One-half cup of syrup,
  • One-half cup of brown sugar,
  • Six tablespoons of shortening,
  • One egg.
  • Cream well and then add One cup of seeded raisins,
  • Two and one-half cups of flour,
  • One-half teaspoon of baking soda dissolved in
  • One-quarter cup of cold water or milk,
  • One-quarter teaspoonful mace,
  • One-quarter teaspoonful cloves,
  • One-half teaspoonful ginger.

Work to a smooth dough and then roll on a slightly floured board and cut.

Brush the tops of the cakes with syrup and sprinkle with finely chopped nuts.

Bake for eight minutes in a moderate oven. This makes about three dozen cakes.

I used molasses as the syrup (why they didn’t say molasses is beyond me) and milk.  The  dough looked like this:

 

Molasses Cakes Dough

Molasses Cakes Dough

It looks like dark biscuit dough to me with extra dots. (Those would be the raisins)  Anyway, I used my hand biscuit cutter and cut things out.  Either I made them too thick or my biscuit cutter is too big, because I didn’t get 36 cakes.  I got these:

Molasses Cakes

Molasses Cakes

I brushed molasses on each cake and sprinkled walnuts on top.  Walnuts were used after carefully deciding that that’s all I had in the house.  After they baked, they looked like this:

Baked Molasses Cakes

Baked Molasses Cakes

Then it was Fred’s turn.  It wasn’t supposed to be, I was going to take them to work, but he found them warm on the counter and had to taste test for himself.  He said ‘They looked sweet, I thought I was going to get a nice sweet biscuit… but they weren’t. Awfully tasty though!’.  Then he helped himself to another.  That Fred, gotta love him!

Until next time, toodles!

Cinnamon Buns

Unlike the recipe in this post my spam folder brought me a Cinnamon Buns recipe I can make.  I refuse to buy a bread machine, I want to beat up that bread dough and this recipe let me do that.  On the other hand, it took a very long time to make.  Next time, I’ll just make my favorite recipe that only takes a couple of hours (if I’m being lazy!).

Anyway, the recipe!

Cinnamon Buns

  • 1 cup scalded milk
  • 4 tbsp shortening
  • 1/2 c. sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 package yeast
  • 1/2 cup 80 degree water
  • 6 cups flour
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 2 tsp cinnamon
  • melted shortening
  • one and one-half cupfuls of currants or small seedless raisins

Scald one cup of milk and then place four tablespoonfuls of shortening, one-half cupful of sugar, one teaspoonful of salt in the mixing bowl, and pour over it the scalded milk.

Stir to thoroughly mix and then cool to 80 degrees Fahrenheit.

Now dissolve one-half yeast cake in one-half cupful of water 80 degrees Fahrenheit, and when the milk is at the proper temperature, add six cupfuls of flour and work to a smooth dough.

Place in a well-greased bowl, turning the dough around in the bowl so that it will be thoroughly coated with shortening.

Cover and let rise three and one-half hours.

Now pull the sides of the dough into the centre and punch down, turning the dough over.

Let rise again for one hour, then turn on a moulding board and divide the dough in half.

Knead each piece into a ball. Cover and let rise or spring for ten minutes.

Now roll out one-quarter inch thick, using a rolling pin.

Brush with melted shortening and sprinkle well with brown sugar, using [pg 21] about one cupful.

Now dust with two teaspoonfuls of cinnamon and spread over the prepared dough one and one-half cupfuls of currants or small seedless raisins. Begin at the edge and roll like a jelly-roll.

Cut in pieces one and one-half inches thick and then place in prepared pans and let rise for one hour.

Then bake in a moderate oven for forty minutes.

I made these, of course.  I love Cinnamon Buns, Cinnamon Rolls, Cinnamon Scones… I like cinnamon.

Anyway, here’s the start of the recipe:

The Start of Cinnamon Buns

The Start of Cinnamon Buns

I had to let that sit a long time before it hit 80 degrees.  My kitchen got reorganized and the junk drawer even got cleaned out.

Then I made the bread dough.  The recipe called for 6 cups of flour, but after 5 and a half, I had a good dough so I stopped adding it.

The Bread Dough

The Bread Dough

I had to wait three hours (I watched a movie and did the laundry) and then I got to punch the dough down.  It looked very much like the previous picture.  Once that rose again, I dumped it out on my mat and got this:

 

Cinnamon Buns Dough

Cinnamon Buns Dough

The recipe said add sugar first and then the cinnamon.  I’m lazy, so I mixed them together:

 

Cinnamon Sugar

Cinnamon Sugar

I was going to add raisins, but someone (Fred) got into my stash.  I found a mostly empty container in my pantry.  Oh well, I like cinnamon buns without raisins too!

I finally got to make the buns and bake them at 350.  This is the final result.

Cinnamon Buns

Cinnamon Buns

They were very tasty.  The dough was yummy and I could have used more sugar and cinnamon for a gooier result, but they were still very good.

But like I said, they just took way too long.  A long time to let the milk cool, three hours to let the first rise happen, another hour, another ten minutes, another hour, then bake.  Sheesh, that’s a lot of work.  I’ll stick to my mother’s favorite in the future.

Unless my spam folder brings another one!

Until next time, toodles!

Washington Apple Cake

This week my spam folder brought me Washington Apple Cake.  I felt that while this isn’t chocolate, it’s a pretty good alternative, considering how delicious it turned out to be.

Washington Apple Cake

  • 3 eggs
  • 2 cups white sugar
  • 1 cup vegetable oil
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 cup chopped walnuts
  • 4 cups thinly sliced apples
  • Topping:
  • 2 (4 ounce) packages cream cheese, softened
  • 1/4 cup butter, melted
  • 2 cups confectioners' sugar
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 9x13 inch pan. Spread apples evenly over the bottom of the pan.

Beat eggs with mixer until thick and light. Combine sugar and oil and add to eggs. Stir together flour, cinnamon, soda and salt. Add to egg mixture and beat in. stir in nuts and vanilla. Batter will be very thick. Spread batter over apples in the pan. Bake at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for 1 hour, or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Remove from the oven and cool. Spread with Cream Cheese Icing.

Topping: To make Cream Cheese Icing: Beat cream cheese until fluffy. Beat in 1/4 cup melted butter, then beat in confectioners sugar and lemon juice. Spread over cooled cake. Refrigerate.

I was going to take pictures of the process, but I got so involved with it I forgot!  I used Gala apples for the recipe and did I mention the whole thing was delicious?

This is what it looked like when it came out of the oven:

Naked Apple Cake

Naked Apple Cake

I call it naked because as you can see, no icing!

The icing was interesting because I’ve never used lemon juice in cream cheese frosting before.  Fred wanted me to skip it because one of his favorite things o this earth is cream cheese frosting (he’d be happy if I gave him a bowl of it and a pile of cookies) but I said, no, I’m following the recipe.

Cream Cheese Frosting

Cream Cheese Frosting

And I am so glad I did.  The slight sourness of the icing and the sweetness of the apples combined into one awesome glorious cake.

Washington Apple Cake

Washington Apple Cake

It was even better for breakfast!

Until next time, toodles!

UBC’s CINNAMON BUNS (Bread Machine)

This week, my spam folder had a recipe that calls for a bread machine.  I don’t own one.  I refuse to own one.  I like beating up bread dough and in my opinion that’s the fun part of making bread, beating it up.  The recipe calls it kneading,  but I call it beating it up.  It is quite relaxing to take a pile of bread dough and go to town on it.  Anyway, this week’s recipe is for Cinnamon Buns.  Something I am very fond of, but if it requires a bread machine, I’m not making them.

UBC's CINNAMON BUNS (Bread Machine)

  • Rolls:
  • 1 cup milk
  • 3 Tbsp water, room temperature
  • 1 egg
  • 2 Tbsp butter
  • ¾ tsp salt
  • 3¼ cups all purpose flour
  • 2 Tbsp sugar
  • 2 tsp bread machine yeast
  • Filling:
  • 6 Tbsp melted butter
  • 1/3 cup plus 1 Tbsp sugar
  • 2 tsp ground cinnamon

Rolls: Put milk, water, egg, butter, salt, flour, sugar and yeast into bread machine pan in order listed by manufacturer. Select dough/manual cycle. When cycle is complete, remove dough from machine to lightly floured surface. If necessary, kneed in enough flour to make dough easy to handle. (This is a soft dough). Cover and let rest for 10 mins. Meanwhile prepare filling. In a small bowl, combine sugar and cinnamon. Roll dough into 14"x9" rectangle. Generously brush with 2 Tbsp melted butter. Place remaining 4 Tbsp melted butter in bottom of 10" diameter by 3" high round baking pan. Sprinkle dough evenly with sugar-cinnamon mixture. Roll dough up tightly like jelly roll, starting from the long side; pinch seam to seal. Remeasure and shape back into 14" long roll. With sharpe knife, cut into 2" slices. Arrange slices in prepared pan and cover loosely with greased wax paper. Let rise in warm draft free place for 20 to 30 mins or until doubled in size. Bake at 350 for 40 - 50 m

ins or unitl done. Remove from oven & immediately invert on to serving tray. Makes 7 large cinnamon buns. For each bun 399 calories, 8.3g protein, 15g fat, 57.5g carbohydrate.

Note: for smaller cinnamon buns, roll dough into 12"x 9" rectangle and proceed as above. Cut dough into 12 (1") slices and proceed as above.

This recipe did teach me that there is such a thing as bread machine yeast.   I had no idea because  I thought there was just yeast and fast rising yeast.

I went to find this recipe in the usual Gutenberg cookbook, but it wasn’t there.  I guess that makes sense, that’s only for books outside of copyright.  A bread machine is too recent to be in there.  Instead, I found it at Dave’s Garden Cookbook.  Well, Dave, your recipe is being used by spammers!  It does look tasty though, maybe I’ll open up my own cookbook and make some cinnamon buns without a bread machine.

Until next time, toodles!

Cocoa Biscuits

Hey there, sugar!

This week’s recipe is one for Cocoa Biscuits. I know biscuits, I’ve made enough of them in my lifetime. Fred surely loves his biscuits with breakfast. Buttermilk, not buttermilk, he’s not picky, as long as he has biscuits. Good thing they freeze okay. Otherwise I’d go crazy with biscuits. If the way to Fred’s heart is through his stomach, that road is paved by biscuits.

Anyway, on to the recipe!

    2 cups or 1 pint of sifted flour,
    3 level teaspoonfuls of baking powder,
    ¬Ω a teaspoonful of salt,
    2 level tablespoonfuls of sugar,
    4 level tablespoonfuls of Baker's Cocoa,
    2 level tablespoonfuls of butter or lard,
    2/3 a cup of milk or enough to make a firm but not a stiff dough.

Sift all the dry ingredients together, rub in the butter with the tips of 
the fingers. Stir in the required amount of milk. Turn out on slightly 
floured board, roll or pat out the desired thickness, place close together 
in pan and bake in very hot oven ten or fifteen minutes.

That’s about half the amount of butter I use in my usual biscuits, but hey, it worked. I used this site to figure out what temperature to set the oven to.  Here’s a picture of the result!

Cocoa Biscuits

Fred tried them out, because he’s willing to try anything related to biscuits.  Even those called ‘Cocoa Biscuits’.  He said ‘they looked like chocolate… but tasted like biscuit! My eyes saw the chocolate but my taste buds didn’t get any.’

He also suggested that next time I add chocolate chips. That Fred, he wants me to add chocolate chips to almost anything as long as there’s no meat in it. He wanted me to add them to the top of the sweet potatoes I made last year for Thanksgiving! We compromised, half was chocolate chips and half was little marshmallows.

Anyway, he didn’t like them enough to replace his beloved morning biscuits, but said if I’d add chocolate chips, they’d be great on special occasions.  Cocoa Biscuits with a touch of chocolate chips.  Whatever makes that boy happy!

Until next time, toodles!

 

Sticky Cinnamon Rolls

Hey there, sugar!

This week’s recipe is one of Fred’s favorites. I knew that before I even started baking. It is a sure way to prove ‘the way to a man’s heart is through his stomach’ and in Fred’s case, he loves cinnamon rolls of all kinds. He’d eat them for every meal if he could (and he has, when I was off visiting my sister).

Anyway, on to the recipe!

Scald one cup of milk and then place

Four tablespoonfuls of shortening,

One-half cupful of sugar,

One teaspoonful of salt


in the mixing bowl, and pour over it the scalded milk. Stir to thoroughly 
mix and then cool to 80 degrees Fahrenheit. Now dissolve one-half yeast 
cake in one-half cupful of water 80 degrees Fahrenheit, and when the milk 
is at the proper temperature, add six cupfuls of flour and work to a 
smooth dough. Place in a well-greased bowl, turning the dough around in 
the bowl so that it will be thoroughly coated with shortening. Cover and 
let rise three and one-half hours. Now pull the sides of the dough into 
the centre and punch down, turning the dough over. Let rise again for one 
hour, then turn on a moulding board and divide the dough in half. Knead 
each piece into a ball. Cover and let rise or spring for ten minutes. 
Now roll out one-quarter inch thick, using a rolling pin. Brush with 
melted shortening and sprinkle well with brown sugar, using [pg 21] 
about one cupful. Now dust with two teaspoonfuls of cinnamon and spread
over the prepared dough one and one-half cupfuls of currant s or small 
seedless raisins. Begin at the edge and roll like a jelly-roll. Cut in 
pieces one and one-half inches thick and then place in prepared pans and 
let rise for one hour. Then bake in a moderate oven for forty minutes.

So the ingredients include:

  • One cup milk
  • 4 tbsp shortening
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 yeast cake
  • 6 cups flour
  • Melted shortening
  • About 1 cup brown sugar
  • 2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 1/2 cup currants or raisins

I had to find out what a yeast cake was and how it compares to my envelopes of yeast. After asking my friend Mr. Google, I found this bit of information:

>http://www.bobsredmill.com/blog/featured-articles/active-dry-yeast-vs-compressed-yeast/

According to that, a yeast cake and a packet are the same size, so I used half my packet or 1 and 1/8 tsp yeast. Although it was interesting to learn that a yeast cake is sweeter than normal yeast.

Anyway, I put the dough together. It was a bit … shaggy, I guess is the word. Bits kept falling off of it. I finally just put the whole mess in bowl and left it to rise… for 3 1/2 hours. That’s the longest time to rise I’ve ever seen… And yes, I do bake bread on occasion. Fred loves my cinnamon bread, especially when I make french toast from it.

Back to the cinnamon rolls. I blew it. They turned out to be cinnamon rocks with a hard coating of brown sugar attached. See my lovely picture? These are some of the most pathetic cinnamon rolls I have ever made, considering it took all day to get to this point.

 

Pathetic Cinnamon Rolls

 

Oh well, I tried. I guess I didn’t use enough yeast or get things to precisely 80 degrees… maybe next time I’ll do better.

Until then, toodles!

Copyright © 2019 The Joy of Spam Folder Cooking

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑