The Joy of Spam Folder Cooking

Category: Bread (page 1 of 2)

Mississippi Cornbread

I think I mentioned before, I love cornbread.  I was very happy when my spam folder brought me a new recipe for cornbread, this one is called Mississippi Cornbread.  It’s a bit different from most cornbreads I’ve made, but in the interests of writing this blog I gave it a shot.

The recipe!

MIssissippi Cornbread

  • cup buttermilk (or 7 ounces of milk + 1 ounce vinegar or lemon juice, mixed and left to sit for about 30 minutes until curdled. If you're in a hurry, mix the milk and vinegar or lemon juice and microwave it for 20-30 seconds on high power.)
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 cup yellow cornmeal
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder (if you're at high altitude, use 1 teaspoon baking powder, else the cornbread will rise too high, then fall)
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons of bacon drippings or vegetable oil
  • 3/4 cup whole kernel corn
  • 1/2-3/4 cup grated sharp cheddar (optional
  • 1-4 finely chopped jalapeno or chile peppers, no seeds (optional)
  • 2 cloves finely minced garlic (optional)

Pour drippings or oil into an 9-inch square baking pan.

Heat pan in a 450 degree oven until oil is smoking hot.

While pan is heating, mix dry ingredients and any of the optional ingredients in medium-sized bowl.

Beat egg into buttermilk.

Add liquids to dry mixture, just until blended.

Do not overmix!

Carefully remove the smoking pan from oven and pour cornbread batter into pan. If the oil is properly hot, then the batter will sizzle as it hits the oil. (This sizzle is what makes a nice, crunchy bottom crust.)

Bake for 15-20 minutes, or until the top crust is golden brown.

Cut into wedges. Serve with butter or margarine.

Note 1: The batter will begin to rise as soon as the liquid and dry ingredients are mixed, so mix them right before you remove the hot pan from the oven.

Note 2: If you use a 10" round cast-iron skillet instead of the 9" baking pan, you should double the recipe without doubling the oil. If you don't double the recipe for the 10" skillet, your cornbread will be very thin.

As you can see, the recipe calls for jalapenos if I was so inclined.  I wasn’t, mainly because I didn’t have any in the house and also because I was pretty sure Fred wouldn’t touch them.  Though he did run off with one of those scones

It’s a weird recipe though, most of my cornbread recipes have some flour in them, but this one has none.  I read it repeatedly thinking I was just missing the word ‘flour’ but, no flour.  Weird, right?

I didn’t have any buttermilk, so I made it with the vinegar while I was waiting for the oven to heat up.  Here’s a picture.

Making buttermilk from milk

Making buttermilk from milk

Then I put the dry ingredients together, and took a picture of that.  I was still waiting for the oven to warm up and rather bored.

Mississippi Cornbread dry ingredients

Mississippi Cornbread dry ingredients

The oven finally hit 450 and I put my 9″ pan in.  And of course, I took a picture of that too.

Heating up a pan

Heating up a pan

It’s blurry because I took it quickly after I opened the oven door.   Open, shoot, close gives blurry picture for future reference.

Then I waited… and waited… and waited…

The pan never started to smoke, but the oil was turning kind of brown, so I dubbed it ready.  Plus, I was bored.  It’s really boring watching a pan in an oven and hoping that it’ll start smoking.  Every time I opened the oven to check, my eyes started watering, so I figured it must be close.

I didn’t take a picture of pouring the batter into the pan, but I can assure you it did sizzle quite loudly.  I assume that means I got it hot enough, even though I didn’t actually see smoke.

And this is the finished product, pretty, isn’t it!

Mississippi Cornbread

Mississippi Cornbread

Fred said it was tasty and ate 3 pieces.  I think we can call this a success.

Sally Lunn

This week my spam folder brought me a bread recipe.  That seemed interesting, until I noticed the title.  It’s called Sally Lunn.  That doesn’t sound like a bread recipe to me, it sounds like someone I met at the hair salon.

Anyway, I decided to give this recipe a shot.  Even though it didn’t let me beat up the bread dough, which is my favorite thing to do when baking bread.

Anyway, the recipe!

Sally Lunn

  • One cup scalded milk, cooled to 80 degrees,
  • One-half cup sugar,
  • Four tablespoonfuls of shortening,
  • One well-beaten egg,
  • One-half yeast cake crumbled in.
  • Two and three-quarter cupfuls of sifted flour,
  • One teaspoonful of salt.

Beat the first five ingredients together.

Then add the flour and salt.

Beat well, cover and let rise for three hours, beat again.

Now grease thoroughly an oblong or round baking pan; take the Sally Lunn and beat for five minutes, pour into the prepared pan, having the dough fill the pan about one-half; let rise twenty minutes in warm place, bake in hot oven twenty-five minutes, then dust with sugar.

First thing, letting the scalded milk cool took forever.  It took so long I even took a picture of it.

Sally Lunn Scalded Milk Cooling

Sally Lunn Scalded Milk Cooling

I was so bored I took a picture of that thermometer.  I even resorted to cleaning out my junk drawer in the kitchen because I was so bored.

Once it finally cooled, I mixed everything together and then let it rise.  These three hour rising times are seriously long, you know?  I cleaned the basement and the bathroom while waiting.  I guess making this stuff was a good thing, because those chores did get done.

Beating Sally Lunn

Beating Sally Lunn

That caption is wrong, but right at the same time.  The bread dough is being beaten by the KitchenAid® but at the same time, the bread dough is called Sally Lunn.  Whoever named this is weird.

Anyway, this is what it looked like when I put  it in the pan to rise for twenty minutes.

Sally Lunn in the pan

Sally Lunn in the pan

I’ve never made a bread that had that wet of a dough.  Normally with all the flour I add while beating up the bread dough they look nice and smooth and elastic.  This just looks wet and almost like a cake dough.

Once I finished baking it, this is what it looked like:

Baked Sally Lunn

Baked Sally Lunn

So it turned out kind of thin., not as tall as I would expect.  It was still good, in fact, Fred pronounced it delicious.  As much as I liked it, it wasn’t three hours of waiting good, so I don’t think I’ll make this again, unlike the Old Virginia Shortcake.  I’ve made that at least twice since the first time I made it, those are delicious!

Until next time, toodles!

Molasses Cakes

My spam folder brought me a new recipe, Molasses Cakes.  I’d never heard of these before, but I decided to give them a shot.  They didn’t look that hard, so I went for it.

Molasses Cakes

  • Place in a mixing bowl
  • One-half cup of syrup,
  • One-half cup of brown sugar,
  • Six tablespoons of shortening,
  • One egg.
  • Cream well and then add One cup of seeded raisins,
  • Two and one-half cups of flour,
  • One-half teaspoon of baking soda dissolved in
  • One-quarter cup of cold water or milk,
  • One-quarter teaspoonful mace,
  • One-quarter teaspoonful cloves,
  • One-half teaspoonful ginger.

Work to a smooth dough and then roll on a slightly floured board and cut.

Brush the tops of the cakes with syrup and sprinkle with finely chopped nuts.

Bake for eight minutes in a moderate oven. This makes about three dozen cakes.

I used molasses as the syrup (why they didn’t say molasses is beyond me) and milk.  The  dough looked like this:

 

Molasses Cakes Dough

Molasses Cakes Dough

It looks like dark biscuit dough to me with extra dots. (Those would be the raisins)  Anyway, I used my hand biscuit cutter and cut things out.  Either I made them too thick or my biscuit cutter is too big, because I didn’t get 36 cakes.  I got these:

Molasses Cakes

Molasses Cakes

I brushed molasses on each cake and sprinkled walnuts on top.  Walnuts were used after carefully deciding that that’s all I had in the house.  After they baked, they looked like this:

Baked Molasses Cakes

Baked Molasses Cakes

Then it was Fred’s turn.  It wasn’t supposed to be, I was going to take them to work, but he found them warm on the counter and had to taste test for himself.  He said ‘They looked sweet, I thought I was going to get a nice sweet biscuit… but they weren’t. Awfully tasty though!’.  Then he helped himself to another.  That Fred, gotta love him!

Until next time, toodles!

English Bath Buns

This week my spam folder brought me something weird.  Well, not weird, but it’s called English Bath Buns.  The good news is that the recipe has nothing to do with bath water, which was Fred’s first question.  I swear, that man.  Has to go straight to the oddness, sometimes I think he’s still thirteen mentally.  Or at least has fits of being a teenager.

English Bath Buns

  • Melt four ounces of butter and then place in a mixing bowl and add
  • One-half cup of sugar,
  • One cup of scalding milk, cooled to 80 degrees.
  • Then add Two well-beaten eggs,
  • One teaspoon of salt,
  • One-half yeast cake.

Stir to thoroughly mix and then add four cups of flour and work to a smooth elastic dough. Grease the mixing bowl well [pg 19] and then put in the dough. Press down well and then turn over. Cover and set to rise for four hours, then turn on a moulding board and knead for two minutes. Cut into pieces for biscuits. Roll between the hands into round balls and then cover and let set on the moulding board for ten minutes. Now press flat with the hands and let rise on a well-greased baking sheet. Let rise for thirty minutes, then brush with a mixture of

Four tablespoonfuls of syrup,

Two tablespoonfuls of water.

Bake in a hot oven for fifteen minutes.

English Bath Bun dough

English Bath Bun dough

That’s what it looked like in my KitchenAid mixer when I put everything in.  Have I mentioned how much I love my KitchenAid recently?  It’s truly an awesome device.

English Bath Bun Dough (Before Rising)

That’s what it looked like before I let it rise for four hours.  The last time I made a recipe that required four hours for the dough to rise, nothing happened.  It turned out awful, so I didn’t have high hopes this time.  But on with the experiment!

English Bath Buns (After Rising)

Well, so, that’s bread dough all right.  I followed the recipe and made little balls of dough.

 

Balls of English Bath Bun Dough

They aren’t pretty, but I wasn’t going for perfection.  I wasn’t sure what kind of syrup this recipe wanted, so I went with melting butter instead.  I melted a quarter-cup of butter, brushed it on, and baked the dough at 450°.  And this is what I got:

 

English Bath Buns

English Bath Buns

Yes, they look a bit goofy, but ohmygoodness, they are SO good.  They rival the Virginia Shortcake in terms of awesomeness.  The Virginia Shortcake only wins that competition because this recipe takes 4 hours for the dough to rise.

Until next time, toodles!

Cinnamon Buns

Unlike the recipe in this post my spam folder brought me a Cinnamon Buns recipe I can make.  I refuse to buy a bread machine, I want to beat up that bread dough and this recipe let me do that.  On the other hand, it took a very long time to make.  Next time, I’ll just make my favorite recipe that only takes a couple of hours (if I’m being lazy!).

Anyway, the recipe!

Cinnamon Buns

  • 1 cup scalded milk
  • 4 tbsp shortening
  • 1/2 c. sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 package yeast
  • 1/2 cup 80 degree water
  • 6 cups flour
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 2 tsp cinnamon
  • melted shortening
  • one and one-half cupfuls of currants or small seedless raisins

Scald one cup of milk and then place four tablespoonfuls of shortening, one-half cupful of sugar, one teaspoonful of salt in the mixing bowl, and pour over it the scalded milk.

Stir to thoroughly mix and then cool to 80 degrees Fahrenheit.

Now dissolve one-half yeast cake in one-half cupful of water 80 degrees Fahrenheit, and when the milk is at the proper temperature, add six cupfuls of flour and work to a smooth dough.

Place in a well-greased bowl, turning the dough around in the bowl so that it will be thoroughly coated with shortening.

Cover and let rise three and one-half hours.

Now pull the sides of the dough into the centre and punch down, turning the dough over.

Let rise again for one hour, then turn on a moulding board and divide the dough in half.

Knead each piece into a ball. Cover and let rise or spring for ten minutes.

Now roll out one-quarter inch thick, using a rolling pin.

Brush with melted shortening and sprinkle well with brown sugar, using [pg 21] about one cupful.

Now dust with two teaspoonfuls of cinnamon and spread over the prepared dough one and one-half cupfuls of currants or small seedless raisins. Begin at the edge and roll like a jelly-roll.

Cut in pieces one and one-half inches thick and then place in prepared pans and let rise for one hour.

Then bake in a moderate oven for forty minutes.

I made these, of course.  I love Cinnamon Buns, Cinnamon Rolls, Cinnamon Scones… I like cinnamon.

Anyway, here’s the start of the recipe:

The Start of Cinnamon Buns

The Start of Cinnamon Buns

I had to let that sit a long time before it hit 80 degrees.  My kitchen got reorganized and the junk drawer even got cleaned out.

Then I made the bread dough.  The recipe called for 6 cups of flour, but after 5 and a half, I had a good dough so I stopped adding it.

The Bread Dough

The Bread Dough

I had to wait three hours (I watched a movie and did the laundry) and then I got to punch the dough down.  It looked very much like the previous picture.  Once that rose again, I dumped it out on my mat and got this:

 

Cinnamon Buns Dough

Cinnamon Buns Dough

The recipe said add sugar first and then the cinnamon.  I’m lazy, so I mixed them together:

 

Cinnamon Sugar

Cinnamon Sugar

I was going to add raisins, but someone (Fred) got into my stash.  I found a mostly empty container in my pantry.  Oh well, I like cinnamon buns without raisins too!

I finally got to make the buns and bake them at 350.  This is the final result.

Cinnamon Buns

Cinnamon Buns

They were very tasty.  The dough was yummy and I could have used more sugar and cinnamon for a gooier result, but they were still very good.

But like I said, they just took way too long.  A long time to let the milk cool, three hours to let the first rise happen, another hour, another ten minutes, another hour, then bake.  Sheesh, that’s a lot of work.  I’ll stick to my mother’s favorite in the future.

Unless my spam folder brings another one!

Until next time, toodles!

Jalapeño Cheddar Scones

This week the spam folder brought me an interesting one.  Jalapeño Cheddar Scones.  I knew without asking Fred would refuse to have anything to do with them.  He loves cheddar cheese but say ‘jalapeño’ to the man and he goes the opposite direction.  I got lucky though, it was time for the annual chili cook off at work.  I usually bring corn bread (have I mentioned how much I love corn bread?) but this time I decided to bring something different.

Jalapeño Cheddar Scones

  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 21/2 cups whole-wheat our
  • 1 tbsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 4 oz sharp cheddar, diced
  • 1 jalapeno, finely diced
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • egg wash
  • 1 egg
  • salt and pepper

Place the butter in the freezer for 30 minutes.

Turn the oven to 400 F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper, or lightly grease the pan if you dont have the paper.

In a large bowl, combine the our, baking powder, and salt.

Prepare your jalapeo and cheese. Cutting the cheese into cubes rather than grating it means youll have pockets of gooey cheese that contrast nicely with the scone. If you want the spice of the jalapeo, leave the seeds and membrane; if you like it milder, remove them and chop up only the pepper itself.

Remove the butter from the freezer and grate it directly into the our mixture. (Use a cheese graterits the best way to break up butter without melting it.) Using your hands, gently squish the butter into the our until everything is incorporated but not smooth. The chunks of butter will create aky scones. Add the jalapeo, cheese, eggs, and milk to the bowl, then use your hands to gently mix everything until it just comes together. It will probably be a little shaggy, but thats just ne.

Sprinkle our on a clean countertop and dump the dough onto it. Gently shape the dough into a disc about 11/2 thick. Cut the dough into six triangles, like a pizza, and move them to the cookie sheet.

In a small bowl, gently beat the egg for the egg wash. Brush it over the scones, then sprinkle salt and pepper over each one. Bake for 25 minutes or until the scones are golden brown

I copied the recipe directly from the spam, which means it really doesn’t look pretty.  It worked, though it was really messy.  I doubled the recipe so I’d have enough scones for the office and that was just fine.

Scones before baking

Jalapeño Cheddar Scones before baking

That’s what they looked like before I baked them.  That doesn’t look messy at all, does it.  But before that, boy that was a mess.  Bits of dough sticking to everything and anything.

After I baked them, this is what they looked like:

Jalapeño Cheddar Scones

Jalapeño Cheddar Scones

That’s a bit messier, isn’t it?  The cheese melted during the baking.

I have to say, one of the scones disappeared before the made it to the office and I’m pretty sure the culprit was Fred.  He wouldn’t say he liked it, but there wasn’t a crumb to be found, so I’m guessing he did, or he found a really good place to hide the remnants!

The guys at work thought they were awesome and asked me to make them again next year.  I told them we’d see, it depends on if the spam folder brings me a really good corn bread recipe again.

Until next time, toodles!

UBC’s CINNAMON BUNS (Bread Machine)

This week, my spam folder had a recipe that calls for a bread machine.  I don’t own one.  I refuse to own one.  I like beating up bread dough and in my opinion that’s the fun part of making bread, beating it up.  The recipe calls it kneading,  but I call it beating it up.  It is quite relaxing to take a pile of bread dough and go to town on it.  Anyway, this week’s recipe is for Cinnamon Buns.  Something I am very fond of, but if it requires a bread machine, I’m not making them.

UBC's CINNAMON BUNS (Bread Machine)

  • Rolls:
  • 1 cup milk
  • 3 Tbsp water, room temperature
  • 1 egg
  • 2 Tbsp butter
  • ¾ tsp salt
  • 3¼ cups all purpose flour
  • 2 Tbsp sugar
  • 2 tsp bread machine yeast
  • Filling:
  • 6 Tbsp melted butter
  • 1/3 cup plus 1 Tbsp sugar
  • 2 tsp ground cinnamon

Rolls: Put milk, water, egg, butter, salt, flour, sugar and yeast into bread machine pan in order listed by manufacturer. Select dough/manual cycle. When cycle is complete, remove dough from machine to lightly floured surface. If necessary, kneed in enough flour to make dough easy to handle. (This is a soft dough). Cover and let rest for 10 mins. Meanwhile prepare filling. In a small bowl, combine sugar and cinnamon. Roll dough into 14"x9" rectangle. Generously brush with 2 Tbsp melted butter. Place remaining 4 Tbsp melted butter in bottom of 10" diameter by 3" high round baking pan. Sprinkle dough evenly with sugar-cinnamon mixture. Roll dough up tightly like jelly roll, starting from the long side; pinch seam to seal. Remeasure and shape back into 14" long roll. With sharpe knife, cut into 2" slices. Arrange slices in prepared pan and cover loosely with greased wax paper. Let rise in warm draft free place for 20 to 30 mins or until doubled in size. Bake at 350 for 40 - 50 m

ins or unitl done. Remove from oven & immediately invert on to serving tray. Makes 7 large cinnamon buns. For each bun 399 calories, 8.3g protein, 15g fat, 57.5g carbohydrate.

Note: for smaller cinnamon buns, roll dough into 12"x 9" rectangle and proceed as above. Cut dough into 12 (1") slices and proceed as above.

This recipe did teach me that there is such a thing as bread machine yeast.   I had no idea because  I thought there was just yeast and fast rising yeast.

I went to find this recipe in the usual Gutenberg cookbook, but it wasn’t there.  I guess that makes sense, that’s only for books outside of copyright.  A bread machine is too recent to be in there.  Instead, I found it at Dave’s Garden Cookbook.  Well, Dave, your recipe is being used by spammers!  It does look tasty though, maybe I’ll open up my own cookbook and make some cinnamon buns without a bread machine.

Until next time, toodles!

Saratoga Corn Cake

I love cornbread.  I’d eat it with every meal if I could.  I mean, I LOVE cornbread.  Luckily, Fred shares this love.  I don’t make it with every meal, but I do make it often.  Fresh hot cornbread with fried chicken and greens?  That’s a meal fit for a king.  Or Fred.  This week, my spam folder gave me Saratoga Corn Cake.  Which, while not exactly cornbread, is close enough that I was excited.

Saratoga Corn Cake

  • 2 cups of pastry flour
  • 1 cup granulated yellow corn meal
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp soda
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 cups thick sour cream or milk
  • 3 tbsp melted butter

Sift together the dry ingredients. Then beat together the two eggs, add the milk and melted butter, and stir into the dry mixture. Beat thoroughly and bake in a large shallow pan for 25 minutes.

I had to type this in pretty, the spam folder kind of mixed it up a bit.  But whatever, it worked.

This is what the batter looked like:

Corn Cake Batter

Corn Cake Batter

I used my 9×13 pan to bake it and baked it at 350.  This is what it looked like when I poured it into the pan:

Corn Cake Batter in the Pan

Corn Cake Batter in the Pan

And when I took it out of the oven:

Saratoga Corn Cake

Saratoga Corn Cake

It was tasty, I’ll give it that.  It was a very sweet cornbread, in other words, just as advertised!  A cornbread as a cake.  I might have to make this for Fred’s birthday… if I could just figure out how to frost it.

Until next time, toodles!

Plain Buns

I do like baking bread and I was happy that this week the Spam folder brought me a bread recipe. Plain buns sounds so boring, but why not? I always thought the name Parker House Rolls sounded weird, so why not plain buns.

And then I read the recipe.

It’s missing really important information…

Plain Buns

Weigh out eighteen ounces of dough and divide into one dozen pieces. Mould into balls and let spring for ten minutes. Now [pg 20] mould up nice and round and then set close together on a well-greased pan. Let rise for thirty-five minutes, and then brush the tops with egg and water; wash and dust lightly with sugar. Bake for eighteen minutes in a hot oven. A small pan of boiling water may be placed in the oven when baking these rolls.

For variety's sake, part of the dough may be baked plain. To the balance add caraway seeds, a little citron, nutmeg or a few currants. If carefully baked and cooled, these rolls may be stored in an air-tight box and they will keep for several days. To reheat, place in an oven with a pan of boiling water for ten minutes to freshen.

Egg wash: One egg and one-fourth cup of milk; beat to mix; apply with small paint brush.

It starts with ‘weigh out eighteen ounces of dough’ and lacks the whole ‘and this is how you make the dough’.  I assume the dough has yeast in it, since you let the buns rise, but seriously, if you give me a bread recipe, give me the whole thing!  Not just ‘here’s what you do with the dough after you put it together’, but how on earth do I put it together?
I will say that adding nutmeg and citron to the buns does sound good. Or maybe a little cinnamon and sugar. That sounds like a great breakfast bun and anything but like a plain bun. I think it could be fun to try adding raisins or other dried fruit, like maybe apples. Apples and cinnamon and sugar. There we go, I can’t wait to try that… once I get the whole recipe!

For now, I think I”ll make this apple cinnamon bread.

Until next time, toodles!

Scalloped Corn

This week my spam folder brought me a recipe for scalloped corn.  I’ve heard of scalloped potatoes, but never scalloped corn.  In fact, one of my favorite meals is scalloped potatoes with ham in it.

So, in the interests of ‘what is this thing?’ I made it!

Scalloped Corn

  • Place in a mixing bowl
  • Three-quarters cup of crushed can corn,
  • One-half cup of fine bread crumbs,
  • One tablespoon of grated onion,
  • Two tablespoons of finely minced parsley,
  • One tablespoon of butter,
  • One teaspoon of salt,
  • One-half teaspoon of paprika,
  • Three tablespoons of flour,
  • One egg,
  • Three-quarters cup of milk.

Mix well and then turn into a well-greased baking dish and bake for thirty minutes in a moderate oven.

Well, first of all… I kind of forgot to buy an onion at the store.  I substituted dried minced onion instead and used 1 teaspoon of it rather than 1 tablespoon.  My brother used to cook for a living and he told me once ‘if you’ve gotta used dried, cut the amount by a third’.  I’ve always followed that rule and so far, he hasn’t steered me wrong.

I was also out of parsley.

Anyway, on to the batter!

Scalloped Corn Batter

Scalloped Corn Batter

Doesn’t look that appetizing, does it?  I poured it into a loaf pan, the same one from the Black Nut Cake and it looked like this:

Scalloped Corn in the Pan

Scalloped Corn in the Pan

Not much better.  But hey, I haven’t baked it yet!  A moderate oven is 350°, so that’s what I baked it at.  And the result!

Scalloped Corn after Baking

Scalloped Corn after Baking

So my dear Fred was kind enough to taste it, even if it didn’t look like the most appetizing thing I’d ever made.  His opinion… ‘not that bad’.  Isn’t that just a lot of praise?  I tasted it, it tastes like soggy corn bread.  Not that bad is right.  I mean, we ate it, but I won’t be making it again.  If I want corn bread, I’m making corn bread!

Until next time, toodles!

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