This week my spam folder brought me a bread recipe.  That seemed interesting, until I noticed the title.  It’s called Sally Lunn.  That doesn’t sound like a bread recipe to me, it sounds like someone I met at the hair salon.

Anyway, I decided to give this recipe a shot.  Even though it didn’t let me beat up the bread dough, which is my favorite thing to do when baking bread.

Anyway, the recipe!

Sally Lunn

  • One cup scalded milk, cooled to 80 degrees,
  • One-half cup sugar,
  • Four tablespoonfuls of shortening,
  • One well-beaten egg,
  • One-half yeast cake crumbled in.
  • Two and three-quarter cupfuls of sifted flour,
  • One teaspoonful of salt.

Beat the first five ingredients together.

Then add the flour and salt.

Beat well, cover and let rise for three hours, beat again.

Now grease thoroughly an oblong or round baking pan; take the Sally Lunn and beat for five minutes, pour into the prepared pan, having the dough fill the pan about one-half; let rise twenty minutes in warm place, bake in hot oven twenty-five minutes, then dust with sugar.

First thing, letting the scalded milk cool took forever.  It took so long I even took a picture of it.

Sally Lunn Scalded Milk Cooling

Sally Lunn Scalded Milk Cooling

I was so bored I took a picture of that thermometer.  I even resorted to cleaning out my junk drawer in the kitchen because I was so bored.

Once it finally cooled, I mixed everything together and then let it rise.  These three hour rising times are seriously long, you know?  I cleaned the basement and the bathroom while waiting.  I guess making this stuff was a good thing, because those chores did get done.

Beating Sally Lunn

Beating Sally Lunn

That caption is wrong, but right at the same time.  The bread dough is being beaten by the KitchenAid® but at the same time, the bread dough is called Sally Lunn.  Whoever named this is weird.

Anyway, this is what it looked like when I put  it in the pan to rise for twenty minutes.

Sally Lunn in the pan

Sally Lunn in the pan

I’ve never made a bread that had that wet of a dough.  Normally with all the flour I add while beating up the bread dough they look nice and smooth and elastic.  This just looks wet and almost like a cake dough.

Once I finished baking it, this is what it looked like:

Baked Sally Lunn

Baked Sally Lunn

So it turned out kind of thin., not as tall as I would expect.  It was still good, in fact, Fred pronounced it delicious.  As much as I liked it, it wasn’t three hours of waiting good, so I don’t think I’ll make this again, unlike the Old Virginia Shortcake.  I’ve made that at least twice since the first time I made it, those are delicious!

Until next time, toodles!